Case Study – Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina showed the value of personal preparedness. Pre-Hurricane Katrina (Katrina) in August 2005, the US relied on the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to assist victims of emergencies. Due to circumstances changing (partly caused by 9/11), the response to Katrina was poorly managed and due to the lack of personal preparedness, the results were devastating for the populous affected. Post Katrina the US implemented a ‘personal preparedness for emergencies’ campaign similar to the Get Ready Get Thru (GRGT) campaign we run in New Zealand.

Solution
Post Katrina the US implemented a ‘personal preparedness for emergencies’ campaign similar to the Get Ready Get Thru (GRGT) campaign we run in NZ.

The Outcome
We ask businesses to assist us to encourage their employees to be prepared at home. WIIFM: a greater chance of your employees turning up for work during an emergency.

For more information please read resource

 

Case study – Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM)

A key goal of Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) is to create resilience in our communities. Resilience means being ready to change and having the ability to survive and adapt in the face of adversity, then come back stronger. An emergency can occur at any time.

Solution
CDEM relies on communities addressing known risks, on people being prepared and requiring those agencies at all levels have an effective response and recovery processes. This can be achieved by fostering commitment and participation at all levels, including central government, local government, businesses, volunteer organisations, families and individuals. Whether small, medium or large all businesses need to be prepared to face crisis caused by an emergency by having formal business continuity plans. Businesses make up an integral part of our civil defence system.

The Outcome
We ask businesses to assist us to create resilience in our communities by preparing themselves to ‘stay open’ during a crisis caused by an emergency.
WIIFM: a greater chance of your business surviving, and being able to capitalise from an emergency.

For more information please read resource

 

CASE STUDY – Emergency Management

Looking for a fun, team building activity with a safety life-skill theme? Yes, then let’s do an emergency drill - but what is behind the teaching of emergency drills.  Amanda Ripley raises an interesting concept in her book: ‘The Unthinkable Who Survives When Disaster Strikes - And Why’: the concept is the Survival Arc.  The Survival Arc comprises of three stages, each of which you have to process to reach the next level. The three stages are 1. Denial (this can’t be happening to me) 2. Deliberation (what should I do) and 3. Action (do it). Teaching emergency drills to eliminate stage 1 and 2 and takes you straight to 3. Action.

Solution
New Zealand ShakeOut our national earthquake drill, taking place at 9:15 am, 15 October 2015 is the perfect activity. It’s a chance for everyone in New Zealand to practise the right action to take during an earthquake – Drop, Cover and Hold.

The Outcome
We ask businesses to register and participate in this triennial event. We also ask you to encourage their employees to register and participate. All you need is at shakeout.govt.nz

WIIFM: a greater chance of your employees (and their families) getting through a calamitous event, putting your business in an advantageous position to be able to capitalise from an emergency.

For more information please read resource